• In an alternative universe, Sun Ra is as beloved a jazz icon as Duke Ellington. Luckily, we do not live in that world. We live in the world where he is a unique genius, probably never to be matched. An inspiration to so many from The MC5 to Sonic Youth to Lou Reed, this album is an exotica-tinged sideways look at his usual innovative work. His debut on a "major" label, the album was produced by the legendary Tom Wilson (Bob Dylan, Simon and Garfunkel, The Velvet Underground, The Mothers of Invention, The Animals). Pressed on heavyweight orange psychedelic splatter vinyl, this is a must for any record collection!
  • The dark, mysterious, and unsettling sound of a children's Catholic choir...sounds unlikely? Then you haven't heard Missa Luba, a marvellous and scary example of what would later become known as "world music". The single from the album (oh yes, there was one), Sanctus, was heavily featured in Lindsay Anderson's immortal film, If.  
  • The one and only long-lost solo album by the amazing Sandy Salisbury, one of the founding members of the 1960's sunshine pop group The Millennium. Produced by Curt Boettcher (The Millennium, The Association, Tommy Roe) and Keith Olsen (The Millennium, Fleetwood Mac, Grateful Dead). First and only time on vinyl!  
  • The original and greatest Brit youth movie featuring the debut soundtrack by the genius of film scores John Barry. Vocal contributions from the film's young stars including future ye-ye girl Gillian Hills and London pop star of the period, Adam Faith  
  • Orson Welles' triumphant return to Hollywood in the 1950's. This strange, dream-like film noir featured the first full soundtrack by Henry Mancini--A menacing riot of found sounds and found music from radio, TV, bar bands, etc. This soundtrack was as innovative and unusual as the film itself. Pressed on heavyweight vinyl with a brand new sleeve which features the original poster as used on the premiere run of this cinema classic.  
  • I Hear a New World is a studio concept album written and produced by Joe Meek with the Blue Men, partially released as an EP in 1960. In 1991, the full LP was issued by RPM Records. In 1998, The Wire listed the album as one of "100 Records that Set the World on Fire (When No One Was Listening)" It was described as having a "profound influence on artists as diverse as Steven Stapleton and Saint Etienne".[8] The title song was covered by the Television Personalities, Mark Sultan and They Might Be Giants in 2004.